Brutalism is Back!

 

 

The term "Brutalist" originated from Le Corbusier’s Cité Radieuse housing development in Marseille, France, designed in the late 1940s. It was awash in béton brut, which translates to "raw concrete."
The brutalist architecture was popular from the 1950s to the mid-'70s and most often institutionally commissioned: many brutalist structures are schools, churches, public housing, and government buildings.

 

 

 

Le Corbusier Cité Radieuse France

 

 

 

 

Naha Prefectural Museum Japan
Cathedral of St Mary of the Assumption San Francisco

 

 

The Brutalist artistic movement as a response to Modernism became popular in the late 20th century. It is manifested in a strong visual impact with its striking rugged textures and statement shapes, that, nonetheless, can complement a variety of different styles, allowing for intricate addition to home design

 

"Where Modernism was poised and polite, Brutalism evolved into something bold and confrontational, its heavy, rugged forms forged of industrial materials that disguised nothing at all " - T Magazine

 

shop brutalism at Cosulich Interiors

 

 

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